Against a Tide of Evil:

How One Man Became the Whistleblower to the First Mass Murder of the Twenty-First Century

The former head of the United Nations in Sudan reveals for the first time the shocking depths of evil plumbed by those in Khartoum who designed and orchestrated ‘the final solution in Darfur’ Against A Tide of Evil How One Man Became the Whistleblower to the First Mass Murder of the Twenty-First Century By Dr. Mukesh Kapila When darkness stalked the plains of Africa one man stood alone to face the evil . . . In this no-holds-barred account, the former head of the United Nations in Sudan reveals for the first time the shocking depths of evil plumbed by those who designed and orchestrated ‘the final solution’ in Darfur. A veteran of humanitarian crisis and ethnic cleansing in Iraq, Rwanda, Srebrenica, Afghanistan and Sierra Leone, Dr Mukesh Kapila arrived in Sudan in March 2003 having made a promise to himself that if he were ever in a position to stop the mass-killers, they would never triumph on his watch. Against a Tide of Evil is a strident and passionate cri de coeur. It is the deeply personal account of one man driven to extreme action by the unwillingness of those in power to stop mass murder. It explores what empowers a man like Mukesh Kapila to stand up and be counted, and to act alone in the face of global indifference and venality. Kapila’s story reads like a knife-edge international thriller as he uses all the powers at his disposal to bring to justice those responsible for the first mass murder of the twenty-first century – the Darfur genocide – and is finally forced to risk all and break every rule to do so.

About the Author

 

  • Paperback: 298 pages
  • Publisher: Pegasusbooks (November 29, 2013)

https://www.amazon.com/Against-Tide-Evil-Whistleblower-Twenty-First/dp/0991099338

 

Amazon Review:
It gives good insight into the conflict in Darfur and particularly Kapila’s …
This is a very important book for everyone who is interested in (working in) conflict resolution. It gives good insight into the conflict in Darfur and particularly Kapila’s dialogues with rebel leaders and victims were fascinating as these provide unique (and sometimes shocking) perspectives that otherwise most of us will never have learned of. As a reader, Kapila takes you by the hand as he openly shares his doubts and considerations against the background of his strong moral, humanitarian convictions. His drive to make the world a more peaceful place are well explained and contextualized throughout the book, and add a very human and personal touch.
The personal angle makes it read like a real-life thriller. Once started, I could not lay it down as I could feel Kapila’s desparation and determination, identified with these feelings and admired him for it. This is one of the strongest components of the book.
However, this personal approach – in which Kapila provides almost exclusively his own perspective on the matter – also makes it difficult to envisage alternative perpectives or courses of actions in light of the decision-making dilemmas he was facing. It triggered my curiousity in gainining insight in the point of view of the counterparts at the UN he most notably criticizes (i.e. Kofi Annan). Why was Annan not more responsive to the plight of the people of Darfur? What constraints did he face?
I therefore think the book would have benefitted from a more balanced approach in terms of trying to understand the political context of the UN at the time, and the constraints, interests and perspectives of the actors in it. As good and sincere as Kapila’s intentions were (almost the exclusive justification for the decisions he took), as a reader interested in international relations I would have found it very interesting to read his reflections -perhaps in hindsight- on how he could have – if at all – better capitalized on his drivers within the UN and with an understanding of the constraints that the system poses.
Nevertheless, I can only recommend this book as it is touching, shocking, and insightful, and also motivating and encouraging in terms of contributing to conflict resolution. This is even more the case if you keep asking yourself what you would have done had you been in his position.

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